Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Born Today(30/3)

1) Robbie Coltrane Picture  Robbie Coltrane:
Actor, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone Robbie Coltrane, one of Britain's most popular comedians who was head of debating society at school, and won prizes for his art, is now an international film star who played in two James Bond films, and appeared as Rubeus Hagrid in the 'Harry Potter' franchise. He was born Anthony Robert McMillan on March 30...

2)   Warren Beatty:
Actor, Bonnie and Clyde One of the most fascinating characters in Hollywood history, Warren Beatty was born Henry Warren Beaty in Richmond, Virginia on March 30, 1937. His mother, Kathlyn, was a drama teacher who gave it up to settle down in Virginia and raise a family, although it was never in doubt that Beatty and his sister...

3) Paul Reiser Picture  Paul Reiser:
Actor, Aliens Paul Reiser is one of a handful of stand-up comedians who, in the the 1990s, were given the opportunity to create their own sitcoms. "Mad About You," which co-starred Emmy winner Helen Hunt as his wife, was a huge success and enjoyed a very long and very comfortable run, placing Paul squarely on the entertainment map...

4) Juliet Landau Picture  Juliet Landau:
Actress, Ed Wood Juliet Landau, the daughter of Martin Landau and Barbara Bain, co-starred in Tim Burton's highly acclaimed Ed Wood as "Loretta King" and starred opposite Whoopi Goldberg and Armin Mueller-Stahl in New Line Cinema's Theodore Rex as "Dr. Veronica Shade". She portrays "Drusilla" in the television dramas Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel...
5)Rupert Evans Picture  Rupert Evans:
Actor, Hellboy Having graduated from Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art, Rupert Evans started his career working mainly in television. Notably in British costume dramas such as 'Sons & Lovers' starring Sarah Lancashire and Hugo Speer, North and South, 'Crime and Punishment' and 'Fingersmith' with Imelda Staunton and Charles Dance...

 6)  Mili Avital Picture Mili Avital:
Actress, Stargate Mili Avital began her career at the age of 17 in Christopher Hampton's Dangerous Liaisons, at the Cameri Theater of Tel- Aviv. Among her Israeli films, she won the 1992 Israeli Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for Over the Ocean. Arriving in New York in 1994, she was immediately cast as the female lead in Roland Emmerich's Stargate...

7)  Ian Ziering PictureIan Ziering:
Actor, The Guiding Light Ian Ziering began working in television and radio commercials when he was 12 years old. Besides Beverly Hills, 90210, his television work included a stint on the daytime drama, The Guiding Light. He is also the voice of Vinnie in the syndicated cartoon Biker Mice from Mars and one of the voices on the animated series Mighty Ducks...

8)  John Astin Picture John Astin:
Actor, The Frighteners Dark haired, usually mustachioed US actor with a cheeky grin who achieved pop culture status through his portrayal of the kooky patriarch "Gomez Addams" in the hit TV series The Addams Family, John Astin was born March 30, 1930, in Baltimore, MD. He attended Johns Hopkins University and studied mathematics...

9)  Céline Dion PictureCeline Dion:
Soundtrack, Titanic Hailing from the small town of Charlemagne, Québec, Céline Dion has become one of the all-time greatest singers. Céline was born in 1968, the youngest of 14 children. Early in childhood, she sang with her siblings in a small club owned by her parents. From these early experiences, Céline gained the know-how to performing live...

10)  Norah Jones Picture Norah Jones:
Soundtrack, American Wedding She was born Geetali Norah Jones Shankar to legendary Indian musician, Ravi Shankar, and Sue Jones in New York City. Fittingly, her birth name, Geetali, carries the meaning of "song" or "melodious", and was bestowed on her by her father. No one could have possibly imagined how fully she would embody that name...

11) Mark Consuelos Picture Mark Consuelos:
Actor, My Super Ex-Girlfriend Mark Consuelos was born in Zaragoza, Spain, and grew up in Lebanon, Illinois and Tampa, Florida. He attended Bloomingdale High School in Valrico, Florida and Notre Dame University. While living in Illinois, Mark appeared in "Hello, Dolly" at the Looking Glass Playhouse. Before joining All My Children in February 1995...

12) Bahar Soomekh Picture  Bahar Soomekh:
Actress, Saw III Bahar Soomekh was born on March 30th 1975 in Tehran, Iran, to a Persian Jewish family, and moved, at age 4, with her parents and sister, Saba Soomekh, to Los Angeles, United States in 1979, to escape the Iranian revolution. She attended a Yeshiva, Sinai Akiba Academy and Beverly Hills High School, where she played the violin in the school orchestra...

13)  Eric Clapton PictureEric Clapton:
Soundtrack, Back to the Future Eric Clapton was born in Ripley, Surrey, England, on March 30, 1945. His real father was a Canadian pilot but he didn't find that out until he was 53. When he was 2 his mother felt she was unable to look after him, so Eric then went to live with his grandparents. When he was 14 he took up the guitar...

14)  Roland Kickinger Picture  Roland Kickinger:
Actor, Terminator Salvation Roland was born in Vienna, Austria. He spent his childhood in Vienna, where he enjoyed swimming and playing soccer. At the early age of 15 decided he wanted to become a bodybuilder. From that day on, Roland dedicated his life to becoming his very best. While training, Roland continued schooling and graduated from college with a degree in Hotel and Restaurant Management...

15) Gerald McCullouch Picture Gerald McCullouch:
Actor, The Moment After Re-curring guest host of FYE! on E!TV honored by OUT Magazine as One Of The Most Compelling People of 2010. He played "Jesus" in the European tour of "Jesus Christ Superstar". He declined a scholarship to Savannah College of Art and Design to study in the BFA Musical Theatre Program at Florida State University...

Thats all folks!If u want to see more,please visit IMDb!

Wednesday, March 23, 2011


Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011)
Elizabeth Taylor/Retna Ltd.

LOS ANGELES-- Elizabeth Taylor, the violet-eyed film goddess whose sultry screen persona, stormy personal life and enduring fame and glamour made her one of the last of the old-fashioned movie stars and a template for the modern celebrity, died Wednesday at age 79.
She was surrounded by her four children when she died of congestive heart failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where she had been hospitalized for about six weeks, said publicist Sally Morrison.
"My Mother was an extraordinary woman who lived life to the fullest, with great passion, humor, and love," her son, Michael Wilding, said in a statement.
"We know, quite simply, that the world is a better place for Mom having lived in it. Her legacy will never fade, her spirit will always be with us, and her love will live forever in our hearts."
Taylor was the most blessed and cursed of actresses, the toughest and the most vulnerable. She had extraordinary grace, wealth and voluptuous beauty, and won three Academy Awards, including a special one for her humanitarian work. She was the most loyal of friends and a defender of gays in Hollywood when AIDS was still a stigma in the industry and beyond. But she was afflicted by ill health, failed romances (eight marriages, seven husbands) and personal tragedy.
"I think I'm becoming fatalistic," she said in 1989. "Too much has happened in my life for me not to be fatalistic."
Her more than 50 movies included unforgettable portraits of innocence and of decadence, from the children's classic "National Velvet" and the sentimental family comedy "Father of the Bride" to Oscar-winning transgressions in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" and "Butterfield 8." The historical epic "Cleopatra" is among Hollywood's greatest on-screen fiascos and a landmark of off-screen monkey business, the meeting ground of Taylor and Richard Burton, the "Brangelina" of their day.
She played enough bawdy women on film for critic Pauline Kael to deem her "Chaucerian Beverly Hills."

Photos:In Memoriam:Elizabeth Taylor

But her defining role, one that lasted long past her moviemaking days, was "Elizabeth Taylor," ever marrying and divorcing, in and out of hospitals, gaining and losing weight, standing by Michael JacksonRock Hudson and other troubled friends, acquiring a jewelry collection that seemed to rival Tiffany's.
She was a child star who grew up and aged before an adoring, appalled and fascinated public. She arrived in Hollywood when the studio system tightly controlled an actor's life and image, had more marriages than any publicist could explain away and lasted long enough to no longer require explanation. She was the industry's great survivor, and among the first to reach that special category of celebrity — famous for being famous, for whom her work was inseparable from the gossip around it.
The London-born actress was a star at age 12, a bride and a divorcee at 18, a superstar at 19 and a widow at 26. She was a screen sweetheart and martyr later reviled for stealing Eddie Fisher from Debbie Reynolds, then for dumping Fisher to bed Burton, a relationship of epic passion and turbulence, lasting through two marriages and countless attempted reconciliations.

Elizabeth Taylor's love life

She was also forgiven. Reynolds would acknowledge voting for Taylor when she was nominated for "Butterfield 8" and decades later co-starred with her old rival in "These Old Broads," co-written by Carrie Fisher, the daughter of Reynolds and Eddie Fisher.
Taylor's ailments wore down the grudges. She underwent at least 20 major operations and she nearly died from a bout with pneumonia in 1990. In 1994 and 1995, she had both hip joints replaced, and in February 1997, she underwent surgery to remove a benign brain tumor. In 1983, she acknowledged a 35-year addiction to sleeping pills and pain killers. Taylor was treated for alcohol and drug abuse problems at the Betty Ford Clinic in Rancho Mirage, Calif.
Her troubles bonded her to her peers and the public, and deepened her compassion. Her advocacy for AIDS research and for other causes earned her a special Oscar, the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, in 1993.

More: Rembering Elizabeth Taylor

As she accepted it, to a long ovation, she declared, "I call upon you to draw from the depths of your being — to prove that we are a human race, to prove that our love outweighs our need to hate, that our compassion is more compelling than our need to blame."
The dark-haired Taylor made an unforgettable impression in Hollywood with "National Velvet," the 1945 film in which the 12-year-old belle rode a steeplechase horse to victory in the Grand National.
Critic James Agee wrote of her: "Ever since I first saw the child ... I have been choked with the peculiar sort of adoration I might have felt if we were in the same grade of primary school."
"National Velvet," her fifth film, also marked the beginning of Taylor's long string of health issues. During production, she fell off a horse. The resulting back injury continued to haunt her.
Taylor matured into a ravishing beauty in "Father of the Bride," in 1950, and into a respected performer and femme fatale the following year in "A Place in the Sun," based on the Theodore Dreiser novel "An American Tragedy." The movie co-starred her close friend Montgomery Clift as the ambitious young man who drowns his working-class girlfriend to be with the socialite Taylor. In real life, too, men all but committed murder in pursuit of her.
Through the rest of the 1950s and into the 1960s, she and Marilyn Monroe were Hollywood's great sex symbols, both striving for appreciation beyond their physical beauty, both caught up in personal dramas filmmakers could only wish they had imagined. That Taylor lasted, and Monroe died young, was a matter of luck and strength; Taylor lived as she pleased and allowed no one to define her but herself.
"I don't entirely approve of some of the things I have done, or am, or have been. But I'm me. God knows, I'm me," Taylor said around the time she turned 50.
She had a remarkable and exhausting personal and professional life. Her marriage to Michael Todd ended tragically when the producer died in a plane crash in 1958. She took up with Fisher, married him, then left him for Burton. Meanwhile, she received several Academy Award nominations and two Oscars.
She was a box-office star cast in numerous "prestige" films, from "Raintree County" with Clift to "Giant," an epic co-starring her friends Hudson and James Dean. Nominations came from a pair of movies adapted from work by Tennessee Williams: "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" and "Suddenly, Last Summer." In "Butterfield 8," released in 1960, she starred with Fisher as a doomed girl-about-town. Taylor never cared much for the film, but her performance at the Oscars wowed the world.

Photos: Stars we 've lost in 2011

Sympathy for Taylor's widowhood had turned to scorn when she took up with Fisher, who had supposedly been consoling her over the death of Todd. But before the 1961 ceremony, she was hospitalized from a nearly fatal bout with pneumonia and Taylor underwent a tracheotomy. The scar was bandaged when she appeared at the Oscars to accept her best actress trophy for "Butterfield 8."
To a standing ovation, she hobbled to the stage. "I don't really know how to express my great gratitude," she said in an emotional speech. "I guess I will just have to thank you with all my heart." It was one of the most dramatic moments in Academy Awards history.
"Hell, I even voted for her," Reynolds later said.
Greater drama awaited: "Cleopatra." Taylor met Burton while playing the title role in the 1963 epic, in which the brooding, womanizing Welsh actor co-starred as Mark Antony. Their chemistry was not immediate. Taylor found him boorish; Burton mocked her physique. But the love scenes on film continued away from the set and a scandal for the ages was born. Headlines shouted and screamed. Paparazzi snapped and swooned. Their romance created such a sensation that the Vatican denounced the happenings as the "caprices of adult children."
The film so exceeded its budget that the producers lost money even though "Cleopatra" was a box-office hit and won four Academy awards. (With its $44 million budget adjusted for inflation, "Cleopatra" remains the most expensive movie ever made.) Taylor's salary per film topped $1 million. "Liz and Dick" became a couple on a first name basis with millions who had never met them.
They were a prolific acting team, even if most of the movies aged no better than their relationship: "The VIPs" (1963), "The Sandpiper" (1965), "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" (1966), "The Taming of the Shrew" (1967), "The Comedians" (1967), "Dr. Faustus" (1967), "Boom!" (1968), "Under Milk Wood" (1971) and "Hammersmith Is Out" (1972).
Art most effectively imitated life in the adaptation of Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" — in which Taylor and Burton played mates who fought viciously and drank heavily. She took the best actress Oscar for her performance as the venomous Martha in "Virginia Woolf" and again stole the awards show, this time by not showing up at the ceremony. She refused to thank the academy upon learning of her victory and chastised voters for not honoring Burton.
Taylor and Burton divorced in 1974, married again in 1975 and divorced again in 1976.
"We fight a great deal," Burton once said, "and we watch the people around us who don't quite know how to behave during these storms. We don't fight when we are alone."
In 1982, Taylor and Burton appeared in a touring production of the Noel Coward play "Private Lives," in which they starred as a divorced couple who meet on their respective honeymoons. They remained close at the time of Burton's death, in 1984.
Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor was born in London on Feb. 27, 1932, the daughter of Francis Taylor, an art dealer, and the former Sara Sothern, an American stage actress. At age 3, with extensive ballet training already behind her, Taylor danced for British princesses Elizabeth (the future queen) and Margaret Rose at London's Hippodrome. At age 4, she was given a wild field horse that she learned to ride expertly.
At the onset of World War II, the Taylors came to the United States. Francis Taylor opened a gallery in Beverly Hills and, in 1942, his daughter made her screen debut with a bit part in the comedy "There's One Born Every Minute."
Her big break came soon thereafter. While serving as an air-raid warden with MGM producer Sam Marx, Taylor's father learned that the studio was struggling to find an English girl to play opposite Roddy McDowall in "Lassie Come Home." Taylor's screen test for the film won her both the part and a long-term contract. She grew up quickly after that.
Still in school at 16, she would dash from the classroom to the movie set where she played passionate love scenes with Robert Taylor in "Conspirator."
"I have the emotions of a child in the body of a woman," she once said. "I was rushed into womanhood for the movies. It caused me long moments of unhappiness and doubt."
Soon after her screen presence was established, she began a series of very public romances. Early loves included socialite Bill Pawley, home run slugger Ralph Kiner and football star Glenn Davis.
Then, a roll call of husbands:
— She married Conrad Hilton Jr., son of the hotel magnate, in May 1950 at age 18. The marriage ended in divorce that December.
— When she married British actor Michael Wilding in February 1952, he was 39 to her 19. They had two sons, Michael Jr. and Christopher Edward. That marriage lasted 4 years.
— She married cigar-chomping movie producer Michael Todd, also 20 years her senior, in 1957. They had a daughter, Elizabeth Francis. Todd was killed in a plane crash in 1958.
— The best man at the Taylor-Todd wedding was Fisher. He left his wife Debbie Reynolds to marry Taylor in 1959. She converted to Judaism before the wedding.
— Taylor and Fisher moved to London, where she was making "Cleopatra." She met Burton, who also was married. That union produced her fourth child, Maria.
— After her second marriage to Burton ended, she married John Warner, a former secretary of the Navy, in December 1976. Warner was elected a U.S. senator from Virginia in 1978. They divorced in 1982.
— In October 1991, she married Larry Fortensky, a truck driver and construction worker she met while both were undergoing treatment at the Betty Ford Center in 1988. He was 20 years her junior. The wedding, held at the ranch of Michael Jackson, was a media circus that included the din of helicopter blades, a journalist who parachuted to a spot near the couple and a gossip columnist as official scribe.
But in August 1995, she and Fortensky announced a trial separation; she filed for divorce six months later and the split became final in 1997.
"I was taught by my parents that if you fall in love, if you want to have a love affair, you get married," she once remarked. "I guess I'm very old-fashioned."
Her philanthropic interests included assistance for the Israeli War Victims Fund, the Variety Clubs International and the American Foundation for AIDS Research.
She received the Legion of Honor, France's most prestigious award, in 1987, for her efforts to support AIDS research. In May 2000, Queen Elizabeth II made Taylor a dame — the female equivalent of a knight — for her services to the entertainment industry and to charity.
In 1993, she won a lifetime achievement award from the American Film Institute; in 1999, an institute survey of screen legends ranked her No. 7 among actresses.
During much of her later career, Taylor's waistline, various diets, diet books and tangled romances were the butt of jokes by Joan Rivers and others. John Belushimocked her on "Saturday Night Live," dressing up in drag and choking on a piece of chicken.
"It's a wonder I didn't explode," Taylor wrote of her 60-pound weight gain — and successful loss — in the 1988 book "Elizabeth Takes Off on Self-Esteem and Self-Image."
She was an iconic star, but her screen roles became increasingly rare in the 1980s and beyond. She appeared in several television movies, including "Poker Alice" and "Sweet Bird of Youth," and entered the Stone Age as Pearl Slaghoople in the movie version of "The Flintstones." She had a brief role on the popular soap opera "General Hospital."
Taylor was the subject of numerous unauthorized biographies and herself worked on a handful of books, including "Elizabeth Taylor: An Informal Memoir" and "Elizabeth Taylor: My Love Affair With Jewelry." In tune with the media to the end, she kept in touch through her Twitter account.
"I like the connection with fans and people who have been supportive of me," Taylor told Kim Kardashian in a 2011 interview for Harper's Bazaar. "And I love the idea of real feedback and a two-way street, which is very, very modern. But sometimes I think we know too much about our idols and that spoils the dream."
Survivors include her daughters Maria Burton-Carson and Liza Todd-Tivey, sons Christopher and Michael Wilding, 10 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
A private family funeral is planned later this week.



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Tuesday, March 22, 2011

The weekly legend of the Big Screen

Al Pacino

Al PacinoAlfredo James "Al" Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is an American film and stage actor and director. He is most famed for playing mobsters, including Michael Corleone in The Godfather trilogy and Tony Montana in Scarface, though he has also appeared several times on the other side of the law—as a police officer, detective and a lawyer. His role as Frank Slade in Scent of a Woman won him the Academy Award for Best Actor in 1992 after receiving seven previous Oscar nominations.
He made his feature film debut in the 1969 film Me, Natalie in a minor supporting role, before playing the leading role in the 1971 drama The Panic in Needle Park. Pacino made his major breakthrough when he was given the role of Michael Corleone in The Godfather in 1972, which earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. Other Oscar nominations for Best Supporting Actor were for Dick Tracy and Glengarry Glen Ross. Oscar nominations for Best Actor include The Godfather Part II,  Serpico,  Dog Day Afternoon, the court room drama ...And Justice for All and Scent of a Woman.



    Leelee Sobieski and Al Pacino in Sony Pictures' 88 Minutes

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Monday, March 21, 2011

March Movies 2011(Part 3)


 Starring:Michael Ostman

 Plot:Sorry,we weren't able to find the plot T_T

Sucker Punch(25/3)

 Starring:Emily Browning, Vanessa Hudgens, Abbie Cornish, Jamie Chung, Jena Malone, Carla Gugino, Jon Hamm, Oscar Isaac, Scott Glenn
 Plot:A young girl is institutionalized by her wicked stepfather. Retreating to an alternative reality as a coping strategy, she envisions a plan which will help her escape from the facility.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules(25/3)

 Starring:Zachary Gordon, Steve Zahn
 Plot:Live-action adaptation of Jeff Kinney's illustrated novel about a wise-cracking sixth grade student.

March Movies 2011(Part 2)

Jane Eyre(11/3)

 Starring:Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, Judi Dench, Holliday Grainger, Sally Hawkins, Tamzin Merchant, Imogen Poots
 Plot:Jane Eyre is an orphan cast out as a young girl by her aunt, Mrs. Reed, and sent to be raised in a harsh charity school for girls...

Mars Needs Moms(11/3)

 Starring:Seth Green, Mindy Serling, Dan Fogler, Joan Cusack
 Plot:A young boy named Milo gains a deeper appreciation for his mom after Martians come to Earth to take her away.

Red Riding Hoo(11/3)

 Starring:Amanda Seyfried, Shiloh Fernandez, Max Irons, Julie Christie, Gary Oldman
 Plot:Set in a medieval village that is haunted by a werewolf, a young girl falls for an orphaned woodcutter, much to her family's displeasure.


 Starring:Robert De Niro, Bradley Cooper, Abbie Cornish, Anna Friel, Tomas Arana
 Plot:A writer discovers a top-secret drug which bestows him with super human abilities.

The Lincoln Lawyer(18/3)

 Starring:Matthew McConaughey, Marisa Tomei, Ryan Phillippe, William H. Macy, John Leguizamo, Michael Pena, Trace Adkins, Katherine Moennig, Erin Carufel
 Plot:A lawyer conducts business from the back of his Lincoln town car while representing a high-profile client in Beverly Hills.


 Starring:Nick Frost, Simon Pegg, Seth Rogen, Jason Bateman, Kristen Wiig, Bill Hader, Jane Lynch, Sigourney Weaver, Joe Lo Truglio, David Koechner, Blythe Danner, John Carroll Lynch
 Plot:Two British comic-book geeks traveling across the U.S. encounter an alien outside Area 51.

March Movies 2011(Part 1)

Adjustment Bureau(4/3)

                                Starring:Matt Damon, Emily Blunt
Plot:The affair between a politician and a ballerina is affected by mysterious forces keeping the lovers apart.


Starring:Alex Pettyfer,Vannesa Hudgens,Mary-Kate Olsen
Plot:A modern-day take on the "Beauty and the Beast" tale where a New York teen is transformed into a hideous monster in order to find true love.


 Starring:Johnny Depp, Isla Fisher, Abigail Breslin, Bill Nighy, Stephen Root, Ray Winstone, Beth Grant, Ned Beatty, Harry Dean Stanton, Alfred Molina
 Plot:Rango is an ordinary chameleon who accidentally winds up in the town of Dirt, a lawless outpost in the Wild West in desperate need of a new sheriff.

Take Me Home Tonigh(4/3)

 Starring:Topher Grace, Anna Faris, Dan Fogler, Teresa Palmer, Michael Ian Black, Michelle Trachtenberg, Wade Allain-Marcus, Michael Biehn
 Plot:Follow an aimless college grad who pursues his dream girl at a wild Labor Day weekend party. He, his twin sister and their best friend struggle with their burgeoning adulthood over the course of the night.

Red State(5/3)

 Starring:Michael Angarano, Kyle Gallner, Stephen Root, Melissa Leo, Michael Parks, John Goodman, Ralph Garman
 Plot:Set in Middle America, a group of teens receive an online invitation for sex, though they soon encounter fundamentalists with a much more sinister agenda.

Battle: Los Angeles(11/3)

 Starring:Aaron Eckhart, Michelle Rodriguez, Michael Pena, Bridget Moynahan.

 Plot:A Marine Staff Sergeant who has just had his retirement approved goes back into the line of duty in order to assist a 2nd Lieutenant and his platoon as they fight to reclaim the city of Los Angeles from alien invaders. 

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Awards Show Highlights



   Winner - Best Picture

   Winner - Best Actor

   Winner - Best Supporting Actor

   Winner - Best Actress

   Winner - Best Supporting Actress

   Winner - Animated Feature Film

   Winner - Art Direction

   Winner - Cinematography

   Winner - Costume Design

   Winner - Director

   Winner - Documentary Feature

   Winner - Documentary Short

    Winner - Film Editing

     Angus Wall and Kirk Baxter for The Social Network.

   Winner - Foreign Language Film

   Winner - Makeup

   Winner - Original Score

   Winner - Original Song

   Winner - Animated Short


   Winner - Short Film


   Winner - Sound Editing

   Winner - Sound Mixing

   Winner - Visual Effects


   Winner - Adapted Screenplay

   Winner - Original Screenplay






                                           Winner Colin Firth for The King's Speech.

                                           Winner Natalie Portman for Black Swan.

                                           Winner Aaron Sorkin for The Social Network.

                                           Winner Lee Unkrich for Toy Story 3.

             Winners Robert Stromberg, Karen O'Hara for Alice in Wonderland, with presenter Tom Hanks.

                                           Winner Wally Pfister for Inception, with presenter Tom Hanks

Winner Colleen Atwood for Alice in Wonderland.

Winner Christian Bale for The Fighter, with presenter Reese Witherspoon.

Winner Melissa Leo for The Fighter.